digital video still digital video still digital video still digital video still Installation at <i>White Box Gallery</i> 2011 Installation at <i>White Box Gallery</i> (detail) 2011 Installation for <i>GAS + Espresso Garage Awards</i> 2011<br /> Image courtesy of Griffith University Art Gallery and Mick Richards Installation for <i>GAS + Espresso Garage Awards</i> 2011<br /> Image courtesy of Griffith University Art Gallery and Mick Richards Installation for <i>GAS + Espresso Garage Awards</i> 2011<br /> Image courtesy of Griffith University Art Gallery and Mick Richards

Composition with Speed and Light
2011
Four channel video installation


The following text was written by Dr Chris Bennie for the 2011 GAS + Espresso Garage Awards, courtesy of Griffith University Art Gallery.

Kylie Spear is an emerging artist concerned with specific qualities of drawing and mark making that can be intrinsically linked to human experience. She explores this concern through unconventional processes and in installation environments that generate visceral and immersive affects upon viewers. Her recent projects have intensely examined, through video, dripping wax on flesh and tracing the path of the sun around a room. Spear views her creation of marks, whether executed on paper, through video or as an installation, as a formal representation of the boundaries that exist between physical and emotional experience.

Composition with Light and Speed (2011) is a four channel video installation that, in the 2011 GAS Exhibition, was mounted, unconventionally, near the roof line. The work traces a light source as it slowly tracks its way across four monitors. This linear movement draws a ghostly path from right to left. The small gap between monitors creates the impression of windowpanes, which the light source, without disruption, passes seamlessly behind. Resembling the sun, a torch light or slowly arching beam of a lighthouse, the cathartically slow movement of the work, combined with itís lofty elevation is at once taciturn and cosmic.

More specifically, Composition with Light and Speedís endlessly looping format can be seen to examine contemporary societyís relationship with time, in particular the notion that time is repetitive (i.e. it returns on a daily basis), rather than fleeting or discursive.